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Events

Here you will find an overview of all our upcoming and past events, congresses and recent announcements.

current past

Workshop: Emergent Spheres of the Secular in Colonial Asia

An international, comparative and trans-disciplinary workshop organised within the framework of the research programme of the KFG “Multiple Secularities – Beyond the West, Be-yond Modernities”. The workshop seeks to further develop the theoretical and methodological framework of the KFG, and to provide historical analyses that are likely to suggest a variety of indications for possible path dependencies, to be further investigated by researchers concentrating on more recent periods.


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26 - 28 September 2017
Strohsack, room 5.55

Summer retreat

20 - 22 September 2017
Wilhelm Ostwald Park, Großbothen

Colloquium

Johannes Quack (Zurich University): Indispensible and inadequate categories: Some basic anthropological considerations on conceptual sieves

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

6 September 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Pierce Salguero (Penn State University): Healing and/or Salvation? The Relationship Between Secular Medicine and Religious Practice in Medieval Chinese Buddhism

An investigation of how Buddhist writings discursively constructed and defended the boundaries between secular medicine and religious practice. The analysis focuses squarely on the emic language, categories, and logics of the Buddhist texts themselves, as they were translated in China between the third and ninth centuries.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

23 August 2017
9 -11 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Ali Safa'at (University of Brawijaya): Indonesian secularity. An Analysis of State and Islam Relation on Legal Development

"Indonesia is neither a secular state nor a religious state." This sentence is often used to describe the relationship between state and religion in Indonesia based on Pancasila, especially since the New Order era. In Indonesia there has been a real process of secularisation. Starting from the formation of the state with organs that different and separate from religious institutions to the political realities that desacralised. On the other hand, the first principle of Pancasila as state ideology is “Believe in One and only God” as well as Article 29 of the 1945 Constitution expressly states that "the State is based on Belief in One and Only God". This constitutional framework has legal implication and some of the religious law (substance of the Sharia) become state law.
The goal of this study is to explore the historical background and the process of nation state formation as a path of secularisation, to explain the different forms of secularity, nmaley the institutionalisation and type of Indonesian secularity. The phenomenon that will be seen as a result of the dynamic interaction is law as norm made by the state, the institutions and judicial decisions (constitutional court decision), as well as the political state institutions associated with religious authorities. This study uses three theoretical frameworks. First is the relation of religion and state, secondly, religion and state in Islamic perspective, and third, theory of multiple secularities. The religious and state relations framework is used to map the debates among founding fathers concerning the idea of the state and religion relation. Religion and the State in Islamic perspective is used as a framework to map and analyse the idea of the Islamic groups in Indonesia. Multiple secularities theory is used as a framework to analyse the objectives and ways of secularisation as well as identifying the problems to be solved by.

Muktiono (University of Brawijaya): “Decoding Indonesia’s Secularity through the Dynamic Development of Blasphemy Law”

The blasphemy law of Indonesia as legal text has imprinted the interactive patterns of how the multiple actors in such a multicultural country are negotiating, contesting and balancing their religious interests in public sphere under the common state ideology of Pancasila, which put the principle of Ketuhanan Yang Maha Esa (the God as the Only One) at the very first place. The shifts of Indonesian political and legal regimes in fact always agree to uphold the existence of blasphemy law although every of them provides diverse responses to the implementation and application of the law due to the dynamics of social, cultural, political, and legal contexts. Therefore, the features and future of Indonesia’s secularity as the concept of managing national diversity and integrity to some extent will be decoded and explained from the development of blasphemy law in wider perspective based on the thesis that the law is part of power instrument and social system.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

9 August 2017
9 -11 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Dagmar Schwerk (Hamburg University): "Bhutan in Transition: Metamorphosis and Institutionalisation of Buddhist Concepts"

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

2 August 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Nadine Sieveking (Göttingen University): "Negotiating the boundaries of a secular art world within local Muslim contexts: Perspectives from contemporary choreographers in Senegal"

26 July 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

R. Santosh (IIT Madras, Chennai): Engaging with the secular: Some reflections on the contemporary Muslim scenario in Kerala, South India

The contemporary identity articulations of Muslims in India have been deeply shaped by factors such as the specificity of Indian secular constitution that guarantees the minorities with the right to religion and personal laws, the multi-religious context of Indian society and incessant Islamic reformist attempts leading to contestations over theological and organizational issues. All these factors directly or indirectly compelled the community to engage with various dimensions of modernity including the ideals of progress and secularism while engendering a steady process of secularization where Muslim organizations increasingly began to use secular-liberal discourses to articulate their demands and identity. This has become prominent in the context of the rise of Hindu right wing and more recently in the background of the event in which a group of Muslims from Kerala fled to Afghanistan and joined ISIS. In this paper, I draw examples from the Muslims of Kerala to explore several episodes of their engagement with the discourses and practices of secularism in avenues such as civil society activism, communal harmony initiatives, denouncement of religious extremism and in the construction and authentication of a ‘true Islam’ for its members.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

19 July 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Iva Lucic: "Religion, Nation-building and Secularity: the Bosnian Muslims in Socialist Yugoslavia"

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

5 July 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Silke Gülker: "Transcendence in Scientific Work. Investigating Stem Cell Research in Germany and the United States"

The project investigates the role of transcendence constructions in scientific work. Transcendence construction means, in principle, the construction of boundaries between what is assumed as available and not available. Based on the distinction suggested by Schütz and Luckmann between small, intermediate, and great transcendences, the project develops a research perspective that emphasizes the continuity between dealing with innerworldly and dealing with otherworldly unavailabilities.
The empirical analysis is based on two ethnographic case studies in international stem cell research laboratories, one located in the United States and one in Germany. Combining biographical interviews and work observation, it is analyzed in how far concrete entities, such as cells and animals, or the world as a whole are constructed as (un-)available—and in how far these constructions differ between different contexts. Transcendence constructions always have to do with ethical considerations on the one hand and content-related considerations on the other hand: It is about what can (not) be changed and what should (not) be changed. The empirical analysis illustrates how both questions are closely intertwined.
Theoretically, the project argues for disentangling the meaning of transcendence constructions from the meaning of religion. While there is a strong relation between the two, the analysis of transcendence constructions as such is important to understand the ideological foundations of societies, also without deciding whether a particular construction is to be named religious or not.


If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend the colloquium, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

28 June 2017
09 - 11 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Workshop on "Muslim Secularities: Explorations into Concepts of Distinction and Practices of Differentiation"

The Workshop will take place on 18–20 June 2017 at Leipzig University, Humanities Centre for Advanced Studies (Kolleg-Forschergruppe, KFG) „Multiple Secularities – Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities" in preparation for a special issue of Historical Social Research ed. by Markus Dressler, Armando Salvatore, and Monika Wohlrab-Sahr (workshop organisers).


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18 - 20 June 2017

Public Keynote: Neguin Yavari on "Politics Made in the Medieval Islamic World"

Neguin Yavari's public lecture is part of our Workshop on "Muslim Secularities".


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19 June 2017
06:30 p.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55 (Nikolaistr. 8-10)

Public Keynote: Bryan Turner on "One or Many Modernities? Towards a Macro Sociology of Secularization"

Bryan Turner`s public lecture will inaugurate our Workshop on "Muslim Secularities".


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18 June 2017
6 p.m.

Bibliotheca Albertina, Vortragssaal

Colloquium

Alexander van der Haven: "Secular as Religion: Making Religion in Darwin's Century"

In 1894, judge Daniel Paul Schreber, who owing to Freud would become one of history’s best-­known psychiatric cases, was forced to admit that despite having come under the influence of popular-scientific Darwinian literature, there was such a thing as God. The reason was simple: continuous revelations of an undeniable existence of a superhuman realm. Although Schreber claimed never to have been a ‘despiser of religion’ altogether, he presented these events as having become a religious believer, as having exchanged his alliance to secular, scientific, knowledge for a commitment to religious, revealed, knowledge. Yet, a thorough reading of Schreber’s famous memoirs, which outline a new religious worldview based on these experiences, shows that this dichotomy of ‘secular’ and ‘religious’ knowledge veils a far more complex relationship, not only in Schreber’s thought but also representative of his intellectual milieu. This relationship is one not only between traditional religious epistemologies and modern scientific epistemology, but also between what is traditionally seen as the two distinct superhuman and ‘this‐worldly’ realms. Schreber’s true conversion was not from secular to religious knowledge, but accepting that religious and secular knowledge as well as the superhuman and worldly realm cannot be separated.

14 June 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

BURGSTRAßE 21, Room 4.33

Colloquium

Julia Heilen: "Law and Religion in Morocco: The Example of Moroccan Criminal Law".

In the broader context of the dissertation project on “Women in Moroccan Criminal Law – An Analysis of Penal Decisions of the Cour de Cassation” (Frauen im marokkanischen Strafrecht – eine Analyse strafrechtlicher Entscheidungen des Cour de Cassation, working title) this fellowship project aims to analyse how much and what Islamic influence can still be identified in current Moroccan criminal law. Islamic law (aš-šarīca) means to Muslims the law ascribed to God’s revelation and developed from different sources, which regulate the relations of men to God, to their fellow men, as well as to the state authority and to all God‘s creatures in terms of commandments and prohibitions; its application passes through a process of human interpretation within the meaning of Islamic jurisprudence (al-fiqh). Until the 10th century a highly complex and heterogeneous system developed. Concrete demarcation between the religious and the non-religious within this system have to be looked at in the specific context of regions and periods, e.g. parallel jurisdictions. Remarkably external and internal changes mark many of the Muslim countries in the 19th century, with large impacts on Islamic law, especially Islamic criminal law, which was often either abolished or reformed. My fellowship project focuses on current Moroccan criminal law in terms of the Code Pénal and Code de Procédure Pénale. The analysis will concentrate on two types of cases: persisting religious infractions, e.g. blasphemy or fornication, and more indirect influences like certain time limits. For this purpose the legislation will be analysed in its current form as well as in its genesis. Additionally the results should be contextualised by comparison to classical Maliki law and to the French Penal Code.

14 June 2017
2 - 4 p.m.

BURGSTRAßE, Room 4.33

Colloquium

Katja Triplett: "Buddhism and Medicine in Pre-modern Japan and Beyond"

The paper introduces an overview of the adaptation and implementation of Buddhism and medicine in Japan to situate a case study on sixteenth/seventeenth century debates involving these two fields. In early and medieval Japan (sixth to fifteenth century), secularity as a modality of making distinctions was connected to the question of boundary demarcation between Chinese-style cultural techniques including medicine, and complex traditions usually classified as religious such as Daoism, Buddhism and Shintō. A closer look at the emic discourses reveals a dynamic and also contested situation of boundary demarcation activity in regard to religion and medicine. Proponents of the ruling elite in Japan interpreted classifications of religion and other spheres from a different framework from outside of Japan in specific ways, based on their institutional ancestral clan organization. After Buddhism emerged as a powerful incorporation regime of its own, the new influx of ideas and practices from Europe, European colonies in Asia and from China and Korea in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries not only stimulated the intra-cultural boundary demarcation regarding religion and medicine but also inter-cultural boundary negotiations in the case of direct encounters between Europeans, Japanese Christian converts, Buddhists and Neo-Confucian officials. The paper highlights changes in debates during these turbulent times.

7 June 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Anindita Chakrabarti: "Adjudicating Personal Law: An Ethnography of Judicial Practice in Sharia Courts of Kanpur and Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh (India)"

The paper is an ethnographic foray into adjudication of personal law. In India, the phenomenon of ‘legal pluralism’ is conditioned and facilitated by the commitment of the democratic state for socio-cultural diversity. The Article 29 (1) of the Indian Constitution promises that ‘any section of the citizens residing in the territory of India or any part thereof having a distinct language, script or culture of its own shall have the right to conserve the same’. Although the community adjudicating institutions such as the Islamic Courts or the dar ul qazas function in this constitutional framework, every citizen also has the right to approach any civil court as and when they deem necessary. This institutional framework of judicial pluralism exists in uncomfortable tension with the Constitution’s directive principle that suggests formulation of a uniform civil code (UCC). While the issue of personal law of the religious minorities, especially Muslims, has been the cynosure of the UCC debate, there is a paucity of ethnography on the judicial praxis and litigants’ experience of conflict resolution. The present study draws on ethnographic
material from the Sharia Courts of Kanpur and Lucknow. The details of adjudication of ‘personal’ dispute—where family, affect and property are the key issues—make us rethink the relation between the civil and religious judicial spaces.

31 May 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

​Monika Wohlrab-Sahr & Christoph Kleine: Research Programme and Current State of Work of the KFG

Reading: Research Programme​​ (Link below)

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de


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24 May 2017
9 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Public Lecture: Ist der Islam säkularisierbar?

Our Senior Researcher Daniel Kinitz will not only ask the question whether Islam is secularizable as the title of his lecture suggests. He will elaborate on theoretical questions that come along if people talk about "the" Islam or "the" Secularity and discuss possible answers with examples from diverse areas such as: sharia and law, Quran and fundamentalism or religion and arts.


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04 April 2017
07:30 p.m.

Bibliotheca Albertina, Vortragssaal

Colloquium

Sana Chavoshian and Nahid Mozaffari: "From Anti-Western Nativists to Post-Islamist Religious Intellectuals: Trajectories in Iranian Intellectual History."

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

22 March 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Nahid Mozaffari "Sites of Secularity in Early Twentieth Century Iran".

Reading: M.A. JamâIzadeh: Persian Is (as Sweet as) Sugar

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

15 March 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Eva-Maria Tepest on "Translating Religion-as-Culture: Contemporary Arab Psychoanalytic Thought".

Reading: El Shakry, Omnia. 2014. ‘The Arabic Freud: The Unconscious and the Modern Subject.’ Modern Intellectual History 11 (01): 89-118.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

22 February 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Chair: Hubert Seiwert

Reading: Stausberg, Michael. “Distinctions, Differentiations, Ontology, and Non-humans in Theories of Religion.” Method & Theory in the Study of Religion 22/4 (2010): 354–74.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

15 February 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Chair: Christoph Kleine

Reading: Mark Teeuwen: "Early Modern Secularism? Views on Religion in Seji kenbunroku (1816)" Japan Review 25 (2013): 3-19.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

8 February 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Public Lecture: Religion and Politics in Iran

Public Lecture by our Senior Fellow Dr. Nahid Mozaffari on "Politics and Religion in Iran: Historical Contexts and Contemporary Dilemmas."


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6 February 2017
8 p.m.

Bibliotheca Albertina, Vortragssaal

Colloquium

​Presentation: Anna Mrozek on "Religious Freedom and Secularism in the Frame of the German Constitution."

Reading: Christine Langenfeld, Sarah Mohsen: Germany: The teacher head scarf case. January 2005. International Journal of Constitutional Law, Vol. 3, Issue 1, pp. 86-94, 2005.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

18 January 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Rinku Lamba on "Rabindranath Tagore's Conception of Religion."

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

25 January 2017
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Monika Wohlrab-Sahr on "The Study of Islam and the Study of Secularity – a Difficult Relationship."

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

11 January 2017
09-12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Sana Chavoshian on "Differentiations: Piety and Politics among Female Religious Circles in Iran"

Reading: Charles Hirschkind: Is there a Secular Body? In: CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Vol. 26, Issue 4, pp. 633–647.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

15 December 2016
3-6 p.m.

Hörsaal 16, Hörsaalgebäude, Universitätsstraße 1

Colloquium

Presentation: Mohammad Magout on "Applying 'Multiple Secularites' to a Transnational Setting: Social Interaction between international students at Two Ismaili Institutes for Islamic Studies in London."

Reading: Parts of chapter 6 of Mohammad Magout's dissertation "Between Religion and Culture: Academic Discourse and Religious Subjectivity at Two Nizari Ismaili Institutions for Islamic Studies in London."

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

7 December 2016
09 - 12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Start of our series of public lectures with Markus Dreßler

On 6 December our Senior Researcher Markus Dreßler successfully started the KFG's series of public lectures with his talk on "Religion and Politics in Turkey".


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06 December 2016
08 p.m.

Bibliotheca Albertina, Café Alibi

Colloquium

Presentation: Ruth Mas on Talal Asad.

Reading: Talal Asad: What Might an Anthropology of Secularism Look Like? (chapter 1 in: Formations of the Secular (2003), 21-66).

Attention please, it's a Monday!

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

28 November 2016
11 a.m. - 02 p.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Thesis Defence

Our Junior Researcher Mohammad Magout will publicly defend his doctoral thesis "Between Religion and Culture: Academic Discourse and Religious Subjectivity at Two Nizari Ismaili Institutions for Islamic Studies in London".

24 November 2016
10 a.m.

Schillerstraße 6, room S 202

Colloquium

Introduction of our new fellows Nahid Mozaffari, Anna Mrozek and Eva Tepest.

Attention please, this is a Tuesday!

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

15 November 2016
09-12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Chair: Hubert Seiwert

Reading: Martin, David (2014): The Political Future of Religion. In: Martin, David: Religion and Power. No Logos without Mythos. Ashgate.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

9 November 2016
09-12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Sushmita Nath - Between ‘Faith’ and ‘Discovery’: Gandhi’s Religious Politics and the Question of Secularity in India.

Reading: Sudipta Kaviraj: 'Languages of Secularity,' Economic and Political Weekly, vol. XLVIII, no. 50, 2013.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

2 November 2016
09-12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Tom Troughton on "Implications of the secular as an aspect of second dissemination of Tibetan Mahāyāna"

Reading: Guntram Hazod: From the ‘Good Tradition’ to Religion: On some basic aspects of religious conversion in early medieval Tibet and the comparative Central Eurasian Context. History and Anthropology 2015 vol. 26 no. 1, 36-54.

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple-secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

5 October 2016
09-11 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Colloquium

Presentation: Armando Salvatore on "A ‘Soft Secular Distinction’ in the Islamic Ecumene? Dynamics of Adab and Shari’a"

Reading: Colonial Blueprints of Order and Civility (chapter 6 in: Armando Salvatore: The Sociology of Islam: Knowledge, Power and Civility, First Edition. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., 2016.)

If scholars from outside the KFG "Multiple Secularities" wish to attend one of our colloquia, please send a short inquiry to multiple.secularities[at]uni-leipzig.de

21 September 2016
10-12 a.m.

Strohsack, room 5.55

Inaugural ceremony and opening lecture "Multiple Secularities - Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities"

On June 27, 2016 the Humanities Centre for Advanced Studies "Multiple Secularities - Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities" had its inaugural ceremony.

Opening lecture
Andrew March (Yale University): “What is the ‘Civil State’ in Islamic Political Thought?”


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27.06.2016
06:00 p.m.

ceremonial hall, university library "Albertina", Beethovenstraße 6, 04107 Leipzig

Kick-off Workshop "Multiple Secularities - Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities"

The initial meeting of the HCAS’s prospective research fellows created a sound foundation for the future collaborative work on “multiple secularities”.
From June 27 to June 29, 2016, 34 speakers presented their research projects within the broader research programme of the HCAS and discussed them with the audience.


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27.06.-29.06.2016


ceremonial hall, university library "Albertina", Beethovenstraße 6, 04107 Leipzig